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Craig Tillison

Craig Tillison is from Atlanta, Georgia and has a bachelor’s degree in Atmospheric Science from Mississippi State University. He is an accredited Meteorologist of the Royal Meteorological Society (RMet). He has been with Fleetweather since 2019 and is currently a Marine Router on the Pacific Sharks team.

2023 Pacific Tropics Outlook – Impacts from El Niño

For the East Pacific, the official hurricane season stretches from May 15th until November 30th.  In the West Pacific, the typhoon season runs year-round but there are certainly seasonal peaks, the strongest being in September similar to the East Pacific peak. Last year’s La Nina resulted in an above average hurricane season for the Eastern […]

2023 Pacific Tropics Outlook – Impacts from El Niño

Pacific Tropics August Update: How has the season performed so far?

Mid August is fast approaching and so is the middle part of the Pacific Tropical Cyclone Season. Contrary to what was originally forecasted, some surprising developments have taken place for the Eastern and Western Pacific with regards to their respective tropical forecasts and levels of activity. This blog will cover some of the current sea

Pacific Tropics August Update: How has the season performed so far?

Severe Cyclonic Storm Shaheen makes history over North Oman

October and May mark the transitional monsoon seasons across the North Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea. During this transition season weaker deep layer wind shear prevails resulting in an upturn in likely tropical cyclogenesis. Right on cue, a recent system, named by RSMC (New Delhi) as Cyclonic Storm Gulab, formed

Severe Cyclonic Storm Shaheen makes history over North Oman

Good things come to those who wait?

February in the North Atlantic is typically stormy and this winter has been no exception.  There has been a succession of single very large storm force lows that have dominated the whole north Atlantic. This has forced trans-Atlantic voyages to  generally avoid great circles and route well south via the Azores. More regional voyages are

Good things come to those who wait?

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